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Are Faith Leaders Mental Health “First Responders”?

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Are Faith Leaders Mental Health “First Responders”?

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Author Archives: samaritancounsel

Are Faith Leaders Mental Health “First Responders”?

Mental health matters. It’s a basic need. That’s the message our community has been sending with its significant investment in mental health in recent years. In particular, the Basic Needs Giving Partnership Fund within the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region, supported by the J. J. Keller Foundation, the U.S. Venture Fund for Basic Needs […]



Want to be happier? Try these four intentional gratitude strategies.

  Gratitude is a powerful thing. Research shows it can reduce depression, enhance resilience and improve relationship satisfaction. Gratitude is also hard. Just like anything else worth doing — playing piano, ballroom dancing or sinking a long putt — it takes practice. That’s why we love these four strategies for cultivating gratitude from the Greater Good […]


Samaritan collaborates on grant projects

Front-Page News Samaritan Counseling Center is featured in this front-page article by Katherine Lymn of the Post-Crescent on the $3 million in grants given by the Basic Needs Giving Partnership in the Fox Valley, Oshkosh and Green Bay — many of which support mental health as a basic need. The Basic Needs Giving Partnership Fund within the Community […]


Brain Development and Teen Behavior

Brains “Under Construction” Did you know the brain continues to develop throughout adolescence? In fact, it is not fully developed until mid-twenties. The parts of the brain responsible for big-picture thinking, impulse control and planning — hallmarks of adult behavior — are among the last to mature, National Institute of Mental Health research shows. This helps […]


Trestle Trail Tragedy: Easing Anxiety and Fear

Traumatic events like the Trestle Trail tragedy can impact the community’s sense of safety and security, says Samaritan therapist Dede Harris-Bruss. It’s normal to experience both emotional and physical responses, Harris-Bruss says. “Even if you were not directly impacted by the event, it is normal to feel anxious, scared, sad and uncertain about the future.” […]